We voted this morning

We voted this morning

“I’m almost surprised you’re letting me take her,” Harry said to Cam after handing his wife into the carriage.

“Oh, we voted this morning, and it was a unanimous decision,” his brother-in-law replied in a matter-of-fact tone.

“You voted on my marriage?”

“Yes, we decided you fit in with the family quite well.”

“Oh, God,” Harry said, just as Cam closed the carriage door.

— from Tempt Me at Twilight (Hathaways #3) by Lisa Kleypas

I love a series based around a family, and the Hathaways are especially great, since an unexpected inheritance elevated them to aristocracy. I really like fish out of water stories and this series is full of them finding their way in a new place.

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A mature young woman of nine

“When George and I married, Alex was only eight—”

“Nine!” she called.

“Pardon me. Lady Alexandra Huntington was a mature young woman of nine.” She chuckled, the sound brushing Collin’s spine. “She had a rather fierce crush on George—”

“My grown cousin!”

“—and she found it difficult to like me. In fact, I believe to this very day that she plotted my murder.”

“Not true. I only wanted to run you off.”

“Well, thankfully I’d said my vows just before I met her, or I may very well have abandoned him.”

— from To Tempt A Scotsman by Victoria Dahl

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So where do I stab him?

“Get the pistol,” he managed.

As Minerva dove to retrieve the weapon, Colin tightened his legs about the highwayman’s neck.

“I know what you’re thinking,” he said, his voice strained with effort. “You’re thinking that she’s just an innocent miss with spectacles. That she can’t possibly know how to fire that weapon. But you’re wrong. She’s had training.” He raised his voice. “Min, show him. Shoot that birch tree over there.”

“I’m not firing at a tree! I’d waste my shot, and I haven’t more powder. Then what help would I be? Really, Colin.”

“See?” Colin said to the suffocating man. “She knows what she’s doing.” He released the robber with one final half-strength kick to the jaw. “No sudden moves.”

Minerva focused her gaze and held the pistol steady. “Do I shoot him?”

“No. No, there’s a knife in my right boot. Fetch it, kindly.”

Keeping the pistol trained on the robber at all times, she moved sideways until she could reach the boot. She found the knife with one hand and fumbled it open, wielding it like a dagger.

“All right,” she said, glaring down at the highwayman. “So where do I stab him?”

Stab him? Colin stared up at her, amazed.

— from A Week to Be Wicked (Spindle Cove #2) by Tessa Dare

I love, love, love bespectacled Minerva, and Colin, who knows not to underestimate her. The whole Spindle Cove series is such a delight.

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No going back from this

And it occurred to her, as she made that mad dash down the lane—clutching a blazing hot pistol in one hand and a fistful of money in the other—that this surely must mark some turning point in her life. Really, there was no going back from this.

— from A Week to Be Wicked (Spindle Cove #2) by Tessa Dare

I wish I could visit Spindle Cove.

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Huzzah! Suffragettes!

“You’re mispronouncing that word.”

“Suffragette? How does one pronounce it, then?”

“Suffragette is pronounced with an exclamation point at the end. Like this: ‘Huzzah! Suffragettes!”

— from The Suffragette Scandal (The Brothers Sinister #4) by Courtney Milan

Historical romance + a badass suffragette? YES FOREVER. Love this whole series so much.

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Options other than marriage

“Perhaps most women think it is easier to marry than to support themselves,” he said, deliberately provoking her.

“Easier?” she snorted. “I’ve never seen a shred of evidence that spending the rest of one’s days in domestic drudgery is any easier than working at some trade. What women need is more education, more choices, and then they will be able to consider options for themselves other than marriage.”

— from Suddenly You by Lisa Kleypas, set in 1836 London.

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Tea with an abolitionist countess

The countess reached for the bell pull. “I’ll order some tea for us, Miss Greenleaf.”

“You should get along famously. You’re both reformers,” said Trevor. He looked at Lucy while nodding in Lady Blackstone’s direction and said, “Abolition.” Then he did the reverse and said, “Rights for women.”

And drat the man if he didn’t then stride out without even a glance back, leaving her standing in her ill-fitting dress, facing the prospect of tea with an abolitionist countess.

— from The Likelihood of Lucy (Regency Reformers) by Jenny Holiday